Read COVID-19 Mortality Among American Indian and...
This report describes COVID-19-associated mortality among American Indian and Alaska Native persons compared with non-Hispanic White persons.

A recent analysis found that… COVID-19 cases among AI/AN persons was 3.5 times that among White persons… the age-adjusted AI/AN COVID-19 mortality rate… was 1.8… times that among White persons… Among persons aged 20–29 years, 30–39 years, and 40–49 years, the COVID-19 mortality rates among AI/AN were 10.5, 11.6, and 8.2 times, respectively, those among White persons.

Replied to https://emsenn.net/postings/517/ by emsennemsenn (emsenn.net)
This is an amazing series of photographs and piece of journalism. I, and many Indigenous peers, have been dismissed as “racial supremacists” in the past for our belief that it is Indigenous cultures that are capable of surviving, not kyriarchists. It’s difficult to tolerate such hateful misrep...

The approach of this photo-journalist stands in stark contrast to the history of taking photos of Indigenous peoples, which was recently expressed beautifully in “No, not even for a picture.

Read 2020-12-10: A Paradox of Hypocrisy by Andrew Ragland
Jack must pass a mystic challenge as well as a physical.

This is not the answer Rodney was hoping for, but it is an answer that he can accept.

In a lot of conceptions of “post-colonial” negotiations between Indigenous peoples and colonizers and those forced into Collaboration with the colonizers, the Indigenous peoples are portrayed as judge, jury, and executioner. To me, this always comes off as a projection of colonizer’s fears of having their own tendencies to subjugate turned back on them.

In reality, it has always been much more like how you present here: An exchange of information between two parties as equal, and discussion about what today and tomorrow should look like based on that. And the answers are rarely good, but that doesn’t change that they are the answers.

Read Indigenous Cultures Take Root in New York
The traditional systems of mutual support that undergird many Indigenous Central and North American cultures have formed a safety net during a very dark time in New York City’s history.

This is an amazing series of photographs and piece of journalism. I, and many Indigenous peers, have been dismissed as “racial supremacists” in the past for our belief that it is Indigenous cultures that are capable of surviving, not kyriarchists.

It’s difficult to tolerate such hateful misrepresentation, but made easier by two things: an understanding that the kyriarchists’ whole worldview is a misrepresentation; their view of me is nothing personal. And, regardless of what the kyriachists think or how they act, it doesn’t change that it is Indigenous ways of living that are bringing human people into each new day, far safer than the kyriarchists ever have.