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Eco-Industrialism Curriculum

Eco-Industrialism Curriculum is a(n) curriculum

it is about sustainability, education, and botany

it was released on Oct 21, 2019

Introduction

This document contains the complete curriculum for studying “eco-industrialism,” a philosophy of agriculture and industry which emphasizes democracy and sustainability.

The curriculum is being created by me, emsenn, for myself, to learn about these topics outside of a formal education institution.

Please note that this whole thing is in early development. If you have any input, especially recommended things to learn and things to learn them from, please let me know!

Eco-Industrialism Curriculum

Using This Curriculum

Course-by-Course

Completing Drills

Courses

Ag-1: Intro to Agriculture

Requires: Intro to Plant Bio, Intro to Nutritional Science

Ag-2: Intersection of Ag and Econ

Requires: Intro to Ag, History of the Labor Class: Neocolonialism

Bio-1: Introductory Biology

This course is a basic coverage of biology. It is required for Introductory Plant Biology and Introductory Animal Biology.

This course is based in part on the public notes for the Introductory Biology course taught at MIT in Spring 2018 by Prof. Angelika Amon, Prof. Hazel Sive, and Dr. Diviya Ray

Lessons
Bio-1-A: Cellular Anatomy
Basic Mechanisms of Life: Growth and Reproduction
Cellular Biochemistry

Bio-2: Introductory Plant Biology

This course is a basic coverage of plant biology. It requires Introductory Biology.

Lessons
Mechanisms of a Plant: How They Grow
Biochemistry of a Plant

Bio-3: Introductory Animal Biology

This course is a basic coverage of animal biology. It requires Introductory Biology.

Bio-4: Intro to Natural Ecology

Requires: Intro to Plant Bio, Intro to Animal Bio

Bio-5: Intro to Nutritional Science

Requires: Intro to Animal Bio

Comm-1: Scientific Latin

This course is a basic coverage of the Latin terms common in scientific and medical texts. An understanding of the construction of these terms and their component terms helps one deduce a term's meaning.

Lessons
Com-1-A: Parts of a Latin phrase
Com-1-B: Rote Memorization of Latin Terms

Comm-2: Personal Recordkeeping & Communication

Eng-1: Intro to Engineering

Eng-2: Land Surveying

Requires: Applied Trigonometry

Eng-3: Intro to Mechanical Engineering

Requires: Intro to Engineering

Eng-4: Basic Architecture

Requires: Intro to Mechanical Engineering, Drafting and Design

Eng-5: Fluid Engineering

Requires: Intro to Mechanical Engineering

Eng-6: Thermal Engineering

Requires: Fluid Engineering

Eng-7: Electrical Engineering

Requires: Thermal Engineering

Eng-8: Plumbing

Requires: Fluid Engineering

Eng-9: Drafting and Design

Requires: Intro to Engineering, Personal Recordkeeping & Communication

Geo-1: Basics of Geography

Geo-2: Basics of Climate Science

Geo-3: Study of Anthropogenic Climate Change

Requires: Basics of Climate Science

Hist-1: History of Labor: Ancient to The American Revolution

Hist-2: History of Labor: American Reconstruction to Gilted Age

Requires: History of Labor: Ancient to American Revolution

Hist-3: History of Labor: Neocolonialism

Requires: History of Labor: American Reconstruction to Gilted Age

Hist-4: Study of the IWW Constitution Through Its History

Requires: History of Labor: American Reconstruction to Gilted Age

Hist-5: Study of Contemporary Class War: Means and Ends

Requires: Study of the IWW Constitution Through Its History, History of the Labor Class: Neocolonialism

Hist-6: Comparative Symbology of the Kyriarchy and Labor

Math-1: Applied Trigonometry

Org-1: Methods of Democratic Organization

Requires: Personal Recordkeeping & Communication

Tech-1: Designing a Program

Lessons
Tech-1-A: Function Design Recipe

Reading: How to Design Programs, “Preface,” “Systematic Program Design”

Tech-1-B: How to Program, Arithmetic

Reading: How to Design Programs, “Prologue: How to Program,” “Arithmetic and Arithmetic”

Texts

This section contains a brief description of the texts used in this curriculum.

Earth Care Manual, The: A Permaculture Handbook for Britain and Other Temperate Climates

By Patrick Whitefield Used in Land Surveying

How to Design Programs

https://htdp.org/

Worksheets

Curriculum Tracker

(This section will have a way for tracking my progress through the courses.)

Drills

This section contains questions, meant for use with Org-drill.

Bio-1

Bio-1-A
Bio-1-A-1

Do prokaryotic cells have nuclei?

No
Bio-1-A-2

Do eukaryotic cells have nuclei?

Yes

Tech-1

Tech-1-A
Tech-1-A-1

What is the first step in the function design recipe?

State the problem while planning data definitions.
Tech-1-A-2

What is the second step in the function design recipe, after stating the problem and data definitions?

State what data the function will consume and produce.
Tech-1-A-3

What is the third step in the function design recipe, after stating what data the function will consume and produce?

Create example data and what results would be expected if input to the formula.
Tech-1-A-4

What is the fourth step of the function design recipe, after creating example data and results?

Create a template of the function based on the data definitions.
Tech-1-A-5

What is the fifth step of the function design recipe, after creating a function template?

Program the function: fill in the gaps of the template.
Tech-1-A-6

What is the sixth step of the function design recipe, after programming the function?

Create tests of the function based on the example data created in step #3.
Tech-1-A-7

Which step of the functional design recipe is “Write the problem while planning data definitions”?

The first step.
Tech-1-A-8

Which step of the functional design recipe is “State what data the function will produce and consume?”

The second step.
Tech-1-A-9

Which step of the function design recipe is “Create example data and results”?

The third step
Tech-1-A-10

Which step of the function design recipe is “Create a function template”?

The fourth step.
Tech-1-A-11

Which step of the function design recipe is “Program the function”?

The fifth step.
Tech-1-A-12

Which step of the function design recipe is “Write tests of the function”?

The sixth (final) step.
Tech-1-B
Tech-1-B-1

In Beginner Student Language, predict the result of (- (/ 6 2) 2)

`1`
Tech-1-B-2

In Beginner Student Language, predict the result of (/ (+ (string-length "four") (string->number "6")) 2)

`5`
Tech-1-B-3

In Beginner Student Language, predict the result of:

(and (or (= (string-length "hello world")
	    (string->number "11"))
	 (string=? "hello world" "good morning"))
     (>= (+ (string-length "hello world") 60) 80))
`#false`

Notes

Tech-1

Notes on “How to Design Programs”
Preface

program design—but not programming—deserves the same role in a liberal-arts education as mathematics and language skills.

That's quite a claim. I'd counter-argue that program design should be a fundamental part of a mathematics education, and separating it elevates it.


The text instructs I copy this for memory. It's a “function design recipe,” that is, it is the steps to be followed when creating a new function or program:

  1. From Problem Analysis to Data Definitions
    • Identify the information that must be represented and how it is represented in the chosen programming language. Formulate data definitions and illustrate them with examples.
  2. Signature, Purpose Statement, Header
    • State what kind of data the desired function consumes and produces. Formulate a concise answer to the question what the function computes. Define a stub that lives up to the signature.
  3. Functional Examples
    • Work through examples that illustrate the function’s purpose.
  4. Function Template
    • Translate the data definitions into an outline of the function.
  5. Function Definition
    • Fill in the gaps in the function template. Exploit the purpose statement and the examples.
  6. Testing
    • Articulate the examples as tests and ensure that the function passes all. Doing so discovers mistakes. Tests also supplement examples in that they help others read and understand the definition when the need arises—and it will arise for any serious program.

Later on in the section - after talking about the scope of the book, it abbreviates these points:

  1. analyze a problem statement, typically stated as a word problem;
  2. extract and express its essence, abstractly;
  3. illustrate the essence with examples;
  4. make outlines and plans based on this analysis;
  5. evaluate results with respect to expected outcomes; and
  6. revise the product in light of failed checks and tests.

Let's put that in my own words now.

When designing a new program or function:

(Seventh, go back and take another swing at steps #4 and #5, because pobody's nerfect.)

The rest of the preface talks about the organization of the book, what order it should be read in for what purpose, and so on. To sum up, I'm going to read it beginning to end. At the end of each section, I'll try and come up with some flashcards for myself. As it's all theory-heavy, I'll probably learn the material through relating keywords to the concepts; keywords emphasized by the flashcards.

That's the end of the preface. Off to make cards!

Prologue: How to Program